Blue – A New Paradigm

I am currently going through the professional training program on Somatic Experiencing ® (SE) – a psychobiological method for the resolution and healing of trauma. I was struck by what the trainer taught us regarding the concept of society being addicted to the “red vortex.” The red vortex represents trauma and intensity (think the evening news). In the training, we learn how people get sucked into the red vortex as they reach the edges of intense experiences and that reliving the intensity of what happened in that experience is not healing. The trainer spoke about how it is not our fault that we are red addicted; we are born into a society that is inherently disconnected from our true nature, which is to live in harmony with nature and one another. SE therapy helps the patient reconnect with their body’s inherent ability to heal.

A key point of SE is that after we have a traumatic experience we tend to live in extremes – either avoiding intensity by trying to feel good all the time (think addiction), or living out intense experiences that activate the nervous system similar to the original trauma. In the SE training, we are taught to move towards the “blue vortex” first – feeling safe and socially connected – before moving towards the red. This back and forth movement gets lost in trauma.

The goal of SE is to increase our flexibility to move back and forth between both the pleasure and pain life offers and to have resiliency so we can be present to what is happening in the here and now. By being in the here and now, we have an embodied experience which allows us to be present for self and others. Imagine what the world would look like if we each learn to be that engaged in our own process so we can connect with others in such an open way.

To learn more about Somatic Experiencing® and how it can improve your life, contact The Meadows at 800-244-4949 with your questions, and start receiving the help you need.

The Meadows ptsd treatment center in Wickenburg, AZ. recently announced preliminary findings of an ongoing treatment outcomes study that evaluates the effectiveness of The Meadows’ five-week inpatient treatment program.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s